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12 WAYS TO PEACEFULLY PARENT A STRONG WILLED CHILD


By Pamellah Mutenga |

12 WAYS HOW TO PEACEFULLY PARENT A STRONG WILLED CHILD.

Pamellah Mutenga | 4 Apr 2020

 

1.Remember that strong-willed kids are experiential learners. ...


2.Your strong-willed child wants mastery more than anything. ...

3.Give your strong-willed child choices. ...

4.Give her authority over her own body.

5. Avoid power struggles by using routines and rules.

6. Don't push him into opposing you.

7.Side-step power struggles by letting your child save face.

You don't have to prove you're right. You can, and should, set reasonable expectations and enforce them. But under no circumstances should you try to break your child's will or force him to acquiesce to your views.

8.Listen to her/him.

9.See it from his point of view.

10. Discipline through the relationship, never through punishment.

11. Offer him respect and empathy.

12. If you are a born christian like me, bring your child and all your other children(if you have more than one child) before our Lord Jesus Christ, let the word of God guide you in your parenting journey.

 

Hi, I am Pamellah Mutenga, I believe that parenthood is a journey which must be enjoyed but it starts with happy parents. The passion to empower parents and help children stems from my experience as a mother; wife, born again christian, christian women's leader, and a professional maternity nurse. Pamellah is the director and founder of Abundant Life Family Care.

 

  • Tags: #parentingastrongewilledchild Empowering parents Mothering parents Parenting shaping children
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4 Kommentare


  • Chelsea
    All kids need to hear the word ‘no’, but if you use it constantly, your child may start becoming even more defiant. “Rather than saying ‘No running,’ for example, you could say ‘I need you to walk,’ which is a more positive interaction,” Dr. Raches says. Look for opportunities to praise your child for good behavior as well so it doesn’t feel like he’s always being disciplined or punished.

  • Zoe Gabriella

    We know from science and research that strong-willed kids are often the world changers. They’re natural born leaders, who typically pave the way when no one else will.

    Basically, you’re raising a world changer, and it’s a heavy burden to carry. I know.

    Which is why these five overlooked, yet highly effective tips for parenting a strong-willed child are so important.


  • Zoe Gabriella

    We know from science and research that strong-willed kids are often the world changers. They’re natural born leaders, who typically pave the way when no one else will.

    Basically, you’re raising a world changer, and it’s a heavy burden to carry. I know.


  • madeline

    Your strong-willed child wants mastery more than anything.
    Let her take charge of as many of her own activities as possible. Don’t nag at her to brush her teeth; ask “What else do you need to do before we leave?” If she looks blank, tick off the short list: “Every morning we eat, brush teeth, use the toilet, and pack the backpack. I saw you pack your backpack, that’s terrific! Now, what do you still need to do before we leave?” Kids who feel more independent and in charge of themselves will have less need to be op positional. Not to mention, they take responsibility early.


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